Order Online

In order to maintain distances as required by the state of South Dakota, Falls Park Farmers Market is offering on-line ordering and drive-by pick-up. Learn more and order at https://www.localline.ca/fpfm 

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Eye Candy

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Apple Of My Eye

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Give It A Whirl

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Pump It Up

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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MelonDrama

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Hot Potato

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Room For Shrooms

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Pep Up

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Can Do Attitude

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Petal Pushers

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Priceless Heirloom

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Fresh Since 1912

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Nice Melons

Make Falls Park Farmer’s Market your go to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and delicious food. Open this Saturday from 8am to 1pm!

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Radishes

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Spin Doctor

Make Falls Park Farmer’s Market your go to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and delicious food. Open this Saturday from 8am to 1pm!

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Tearjerker

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Foodie Call

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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We Got The Beets

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Spring Stalkings

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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First Day of Spring

By fallspark, April 18th, 2011 | No Comments »

The weather yesterday started out cold, with a constant clammy mist. But in the afternoon, a sudden warm front turned the day into what felt like the humid heat of the tropics—to NW Iowans, anyway, who are the recent survivors of five months of a blistering cold winter. The gray, flat clouds of the morning transformed into bulging thunderheads that sat in the west, their underbellies dark and their edges rimmed with gold from the sinking sun. Lightning flickered impishly through the clouds’ dark folds, and the accompanying thunder crackled affectionately.

On lawns and in trees all throughout town, male robins strutted magnificently, and the females coyly flicked their tails at them and darted away. Daffodils’ yellow heads unfolded, and the rhubarb in my garden unfurled its first crinkly red leaves. Everywhere, buds were bursting on trees. Kids were peddling their bikes madly down sidewalks, teenagers were playing basketball in the park, and lovers were strolling hand in hand.

The first true day (or, in this case, evening) of spring.

Josh and I also succumbed to the evenings’ charms. Being the parents two very young, very lively children, our definition of romance has devolved dramatically from our pre-parenthood days. Now, having a half-hour to ourselves after the kids are in bed and before we fall over from exhaustion is often as romantic as it gets. As we were getting the kids ready for bed, I said to Josh, “Wouldn’t it be nice to sit in our backyard after the kids are asleep and watch the coming storm?” Josh agreed.

We quickly tucked the little ruffians into bed and made our escape to the back patio, which was completely dark. We brought out chairs, Oreo cookies, and mugs of milk. Josh took his guitar, too. So there we sat, me munching Oreos, Josh strumming his guitar, and both of us enjoying the flickering lightning and warm, humid breeze wafting past us.

BUT.

Just as Josh was strumming the last cords of his song, a bright light burst from the kitchen window which was just behind our heads. I turned and looked into the window, and there was the scowling face of our little boy, staring at us ominously. “I want a cookie,” he said, through the window.

I got up from my chair, walked into the house, and commanded that he get back in bed. I tucked him in and came back inside.

The lightning was still dancing in the sky; the thunder was still mumbling. Josh stood up as I approached, and we melted into each others’ arms. Just then, our neighbor turned her backyard light on, walked outside to check on her flowers, and went back inside, leaving the very bright light on. We sat back down in our chairs. We talked for awhile about our dreams for the future, etc. Then—you guessed it—the kitchen light behind our heads burst on again, and again, the little face of a now-angry boy appeared. “I – WANT – A – COOKIE.”

The End.

By Sharla Kattenberg (Hull, Iowa)

Return to Market

By fallspark, April 10th, 2011 | No Comments »

This is the time of year I begin daily walks around my yard, looking under sodden piles of last November’s leaf debris, poking around the inside of my clematis vines and checking under dried foliage for a glimpse of pale green, anything to indicate crowning hosts or other signs of life.  Although I am tempted to clean all of this away, I’ll leave the old tendrils in place for a few weeks yet for insulation, in case we get a late cold snap.  I’ll start a few of the cold weather crops on the south-facing garden plot that runs the length of my back fence, peas, of course, and sow some lettuce seed.  The fact that I can get out and into the yard has me itching to get moving, get a head start on the season’s heavy work while the weather is comfortably cool. 

As if overnight, the spring bulbs I planted last autumn are poking through the warming soil, and daffodils are beginning to fill in around my backyard aspen tree.  Each year I forget I have them there, and each April I am delighted at the return of these old friends.  The rhubarb clump behind my fence is already leafing out, and those lucky enough to have cultivated a nice asparagus patch will soon have tender, early spears.

 I am no so lucky with asparagus, however, and this is one of the early treats I’ll look for on the Market’s opening day, which is May 7th this year.  Hungry for something spring-like, I caved in and bought a bundle at the supermarket a few weeks back, and even though the spears looked pencil thin, they were still fibrous and kind of inedible, except for the tender buds.  One just cannot push the season.  In addition to the asparagus and radishes, I’ll also have an eye open for rhubarb that first week.  Other vendors will have fresh baked goods, honey and jams, eggs and of course, lovely meats.  There should be bedding plants and herbs, a nice array of cut flowers and flowering plants, geraniums, roses and potted lilies. 

As have many home garden enthusiasts, I’ve spent the past few months perusing garden web sites, checking out the new varieties of flowering perennials, plotting stuff out on graph paper, even coloring some of them in, my garden magazines all earmarked and full of post it notes.  I’ll put the tomatoes where the peppers were last year, put the peppers in pots with marigolds and a few herbs, and grow pole beans and pickling cucumbers up the new lattices I bought on clearance back in October.  I’m a woman with a plan.  But will the peppers do well if grown in pots?  I heard somewhere they would, if given additional feeding throughout the growing season.  I’d like to try growing potatoes in large pots as well, but what is the best way to store them?  Or, can this even be done within the confines of a fairly modern home?   

I look forward to the market’s opening, for whom better to ask these question of than a local produce grower?  I anticipate the ongoing conversation with other home gardeners I run into, talking about what worked for me last year, asking if they’ve tried this, ever done that.  The conversation is endless, and if you love to try your hand at growing things, it never loses its fascination.  So the market becomes more than just a place to buy fresh produce; in its evolution, we now have a return to something very close to what our American marketplace used to be, a place to meet your neighbors, swap ideas, and purchase those things you cannot grow yourself.  It’s a place to socialize; exchange stories an pick up some new recipes.  With all the solid rhetoric about buying local, about promoting sustainability, it makes sense to re-visit those ways that worked for our grandparents at a time when there was no alternative.  It seems we’ve come full circle.  To this writer, that feels good. 

As a new friend of the Falls Park farmers market, I am happy to mention that throughout the seasons the market will be welcoming volunteers from the Master Gardeners program, as well as those outside the program who just love to talk about gardening.  I look forward to an ongoing forum of idea exchanges and hope to meet you there.     (Georgia Totten, Sioux Falls)