Order Online

In order to maintain distances as required by the state of South Dakota, Falls Park Farmers Market is offering on-line ordering and drive-by pick-up. Learn more and order at https://www.localline.ca/fpfm 

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Eye Candy

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Apple Of My Eye

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Give It A Whirl

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Pump It Up

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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MelonDrama

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Hot Potato

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Room For Shrooms

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Pep Up

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Can Do Attitude

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Petal Pushers

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Priceless Heirloom

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Fresh Since 1912

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Nice Melons

Make Falls Park Farmer’s Market your go to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and delicious food. Open this Saturday from 8am to 1pm!

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Radishes

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Spin Doctor

Make Falls Park Farmer’s Market your go to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and delicious food. Open this Saturday from 8am to 1pm!

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Tearjerker

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Foodie Call

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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We Got The Beets

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Spring Stalkings

Don’t miss out on some of the freshest goods in town! Make Falls Park Farmers Market your go-to place for fresh coffee, local flowers and great food. Stop on by this Saturday from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M!

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Ode to the Power of Plants

By Harriet Kattenberg, January 26th, 2015 | No Comments »

On June 16, 2014, Year of THE Flood, we were hit with hail.  Sioux Falls had already experienced a very damaging hail event a few weeks earlier.  A large percentage of Sioux Falls’ cars were damaged, dinged, and dented.  Spring gardens were destroyed.  Roofs needed replacing.

This hail event is the first in my life-time that paid us insurance moneys.  We have had hail before; almost every year, it seems.  But none as severe as to cause cash settlements on buildings, trailers, and our home.  (There is no crop insurance available for specialty crops and no insurance for greenhouse plastics.)

June 16 is Henry’s birthday and this year it was on a Monday.  We decided to take the day off, leave the farm to a limited crew and a project list.  But what to do?  What would be fun, memorable, not so far from home (storms were brewing all around), and something that Henry/Grandpa liked to do?

“Let’s go fishing and have a picnic lunch at Lake Pahoja!”  (Grandma likes to fish; Grandpa not so much.)

We found an empty dock (the whole park was pretty much empty) and threw out some fishing lines.  The wind was wild but little kids and babies are oblivious to wind.  Our hooks, worms and sinkers were blown onto shore.  The game warden stopped, made a little small talk, ignored our fishing license.  Nary a bite.

We found an empty shelter house to eat our picnic lunch.  At the least, the running water smelled like fish.

Mommies took the little kids and babies to the playground and Daddies took Grandma back out to fish.  Grandpa cruised the park paths in his truck, trying to find better cell phone reception; Grandpa’s work day hadn’t stopped.

The wind continued to howl.  The waves lapped and slapped.

Daddies watched the storm on their cell phones as it split and went around the park.  Alissa called the farm crew, “Stop weeding.  Hurry home!”

Finally Grandma said, “I think the water is rising.  I’d feel better if we all went home.”

Alissa and Nathan left the park first.  Soon we all followed.

Grandma’s cell phone rang.  “Mom?  Um … Try to prepare yourself … and prepare Dad, too.  The farm was hit with hail.  It looks pretty bad ….”

Storms were all around.  We didn’t look but went straight into the house.  There would be plenty of time for looking tomorrow.  Our hearts were sick.  The crops had been so beautiful, so lush.  How bad was it?

When strength returned, I took some pictures.  We purchased back-pack sprayers and took turns spraying every crop.  We waded through the mud in bare feet until we had misted every plant with fresh carbon and oxygen, a plant Band-Aid.  Our goal was to seal the plants’ wounds as a scab seals our wounds, to prevent infection, weeping, and oozing.

I took pictures of the damaged plants.  The gardens, in shock, stood still for about a month before crops started to recover and prosper once again.  Later I took some more pictures.

Here’s our tribute to THE Power of Plants!

Your truly humbled and grateful farmer friends,  

Harriet & Henry Kattenberg
Seedtime and Harvest

Time Well Spent-G. Totten, Sioux Falls

By Georgia Totten, July 2nd, 2013 | No Comments »

I received a recent thank you from my daughter for her birthday gifts from June, and in it she included a light apology for what she perceived as a small housekeeping faux pas.  During my recent visit, their home in southwest Minneapolis, like most, received some heavy rain (and a 12-hour overnight power outage).  Not unexpectedly, the backyard had its muddy areas.  My grandson likes to swing on his stomach, and throughout the weekend was often covered toes to knees in mud, which necessitated frequent baths, and she felt the tub could have been cleaned more thoroughly in between.  I was more impressed by her ability to calm the kids (5-year-old George and 9-year-old Piper) in a noisy thunderstorm by making a game out of finding every candle in the house and camping out, indoors, than with the state of her bathtub.

Knowing my girl to be something of a germ-a-phobic, I assured her I never give the slightest thought to her house being anything but clean, and as a wanna-be farmer myself for all these years, I don’t blink an eye at a little misplaced black dirt.  This short back and forth followed a conversation with some women friends last evening about housekeeping in general and how our attitudes toward it have changed. It has me thinking more seriously about the subject.

Those friends of last evening and I are all grandparents, all still working, still busy with life, but for one reason or another, move a little slower now.  We concurred that like many women of our generation, we’d all been energetic housekeepers at some point in our younger lives, but now have other priorities that allow (or force) us to put housework on the back burner, the far back burner, in fact. Energy level is key of course, and as one ages one also quickly learns to pick individual battles within those limited perimeters.  For me, it’s my kitchen and my garden.  If my cupboards and refrigerator are clean and organized, my utensil drawers are free of crumbs, and my garden is watered and reasonably free of weeds, I’m pretty much on top of my game for any given day.  .   

I am also reminded of the late Peg Bracken, whose books reflected a high quality laissez-faire attitude toward domestic labor, and think I’ll read some through again just for the pleasure of her humor. Her I Hate to Cook Book was written before slow-cookers and microwaves changed the way we prepare our meals. In those days homemakers were encouraged to open a can of condensed soup in lieu of a carefully developed sauce and just get out of the kitchen.  Given modern concern about nutrition and healthy lifestyles, cooking is an area I also find important, fresh fruits and veggies, whole grains and all, but I still appreciate that fix-it-and-forget-it attitude whenever possible, still throw together a hot dish from time to time.  

We friends also remembered moms from our own childhoods who didn’t clean much of anything, who spent their summers in the backyard on a lounge chair, hanging out with the family pets (such women usually had not one, but at least two dogs, and perhaps a cat or two) sucking on frozen confections and reading books while their children played in the pool. Yet they showed up at September PTA meetings along with the more meticulous mothers, perhaps dressed in pedal pushers and camp shirts instead of sensible dresses and day pearls, but their kids turned out just fine.  My companions and I had to ask ourselves why we went to all that trouble if ignoring all we thought was necessary still worked in turning out good kids, and why it was so hard for us to let go of what we saw as societal expectations in the housekeeping arena. The end of that story for me (and for my friends as well, I think) is that for many years, I did my best to belong to the equivalent of the former day-pearl set, but now find pedal pushers a better fit. 

So get out and enjoy your garden, get out and enjoy our short summer and your kids.  I’ll share here the best advice my step-mom ever gave me, and I know many other women my age will remember the same if they were lucky enough to have been blessed with not one, but two laid-back moms like mine. Your children (or grandchildren) won’t remember how clean your house was, but they’ll never forget the time you spent with them.  I’ll back that up with my own example.

As mentioned in an earlier entry, I spent Easter in California with my son’s family this year, and he and his wife arranged for a spectacular elongated weekend on the Monterey Peninsula for us all, lovely, luxuriously appointed cottage, visits to the awesome aquarium and other sites, time on the beach, wonderful food.  It was a long weekend we South Dakotan’s dream of.  On returning to their Sacramento area home for the remainder of the week, I had one morning to just sit at the dining room table, making some rudimentary doll clothes with almost 7-year old granddaughter Amelia one morning while her 3-year old brother Henry put together the fire truck floor puzzle I had brought him. We sewed scraps of felt with embroidery thread laced into huge needles into a doll-sized purse, another piece into a cape etc. for the doll I had given her for Christmas.  At the end of the week when I asked her what her favorite time had been during my visit, she responded without hesitation, “Making the doll clothes.”

The garden is finally starting to jump!  The tomatoes and peppers are taking off, and Piper’s small patch of carrots have just been thinned, as have both her and my yellow wax and green beans.  She has zinnias with their second leaves, and I’ve just done a second planting of beets and beans—and dill!  Hoping to stagger the bounty I anticipate and give me time to get it all put away.  I have five over the railing deck planters I’m trying this year, most have herbs and impatiens in them, but I also tried a six pack of mild banana peppers in three and an overflow of beets in another, all strategically placed to catch what I hope are at least six hours of sun. The older I get, the more I gravitate toward raised beds and planters of any kind.  Here again, one has to dole out energy in portions, and any labor saving move is a good one.   My MPLS girl and her husband got innovative this year using horse troughs (these are a bit pricey new, around $200 each.  They bought theirs used from a local famer who only used them for feed). You’ll see that pretty much anything will work as long as it drains well, so get creative and start saving your back.

June 1st already and it is still raining most days.  For newly planted garden seeds that’s a bonus, and for many like me who suffered turf damage due to last year’s drought, this even and gentle rain is just wonderful to help newly planted grass get off the ground (no pun intended).  I’ve had to cordon off areas of new grass to keep my spaniel out, and this was easy to do with a few inexpensive garden stakes and a roll of poultry wire.  My very helpful and awesome brother-in-law from Indiana raked and planted most areas for me during his visit here along with my sister for my oldest grandson’s H.S. graduation two weekends ago, and I’ve got a solid amount of grass already establishing. 

A word here about dogs in the yard and garden; I highly recommend English springers!  They are biting, chewing maniacs as young puppies (as I imagine most breeds are) but by eight months they begin to settle down into really wonderful dogs. A side benefit is keeping unwanted squirrels and rabbits (and ducks!) out of the garden area.  I cannot believe the flash of white and mottled brown my Molly becomes when one of them enters the yard.  The evening before last she caught a young rabbit that wasn’t yet mature enough to evade her blazing quick responses and brought it up the deck in her mouth.  I simply commanded her firmly to “Let it go,” and she released it.  Before I could turn to see if it was injured it disappeared.  I think (and hope) it fared pretty well.  I have kept my poultry wire protection around my new raised beds to avoid her uprooting the newly planted seeds as she races around the area. Springers are a hunting breed, and need a good amount of exercise.  Not a dog for apartment dwellers, unless you plan on running them at the dog park or in the country frequently.

 I just purchased a magazine called Taste of Home Canning & Preserving for its pretty impressive recipes for conserves, pickles, pie filling, spaghetti sauces etc.  At $9.99 it is a bit pricey for a magazine, but it really does have a vast amount of canning and freezing info.  It’s a cookbook, really, fairly thick with no advertisements.  No idea how long it will be available. I purchased it at Hy-Vee on Marion Road and 26th Street this morning.

 Today is really just flat out cold and windy, but I know that soon our weather will heat up and the garden will begin to flourish.  This weather is ideal for getting those early tasks done that seem so arduous in hot weather, so I am pulling perimeter weeds and getting everything planted.  Yes, it’s a little muddy, but better that than the heat and humidity to come.  My hope is to get everything in order by the time the true heat of summer is on us, and just maintain, maintain, maintain.  Then let the canning begin. . .

Oh, just a note about something that happened in late fall and winter in my particular part of town.  Late last October, granddaughter Piper and I heard the call of an owl in early evening on several occasions, and then in February, I saw a great horned flying at dusk down the greenway behind my house and then sitting in one of my backyard trees a few days later.  Because my dog was still pretty young my concern was that she or her next door litter mates might become prey to this obviously large predator, but the Outdoor Campus assured me that they should be safe at their current size.  Well, this owl made several recurring appearances and just amazed me with its size and wing span (which had to be a good 6-7 feet.). Several neighbors also sited it.  I learned that they actually nest in January and February! 

More garden talk later as the season progresses–all is in readiness and anticipation

Back Again, by Georgia Totten

By Georgia Totten, May 9th, 2013 | No Comments »

I ended my last season a but abruptly due to a few health concerns, but am back in the garden saddle for another year.  My venture into the yard this afternoon was to clean up after my English springer spaniel (she joined me just before Thanksgiving and is now just eight months old) and do a bit more raking of the tree debris in the back yard.  The city has picked up curbside in my neighborhood twice now, and will likely have to make a third trip around, and indeed, I see that is scheduled for Monday May 13th in my part of town. There are still piles and piles of limbs in the boulevard. Thought I had my own cleaned up and bagged, but the city trimmed my boulevard trees and so the (slightly smaller) mess is back again. Still I am grateful for the assistance.  I am 62 years old this season, and still a little asthmatic, so looking forward to the end of that routine. 

This spring season will go on record as being the most destructive in most of our memories.  I remember the blizzard of 1967 (I was still at home as a teenager in northwest Indiana that year) and it was bad. Although winter wasn’t all that difficult for us locally this year, the ice storm was the worst I’ve ever experienced.  I actually turned on an electric fan to drown out the sound of breaking tree limbs early on. It was like something out of The Lord of the Rings, terrible, sad destruction of our natural world.  Yet nature rebounds.  I was one of the lucky ones.  Near twenty-year-old trees planted by my late husband were damaged, but not lost.

So this afternoon my raised garden beds were just manageable, and I put in a measly two tomato plants and two Anaheim peppers, and the chives my Minneapolis girl gave me last season came back again.  This year, I will have to protect them not only from the foraging critters (squirrels and those rascally rabbits) but also from my puppy Molly, who has a penchant for chewing sticks, rocks, and probably garden plants.  She has thwarted the local mallard duck pair from re-nesting in my yard however, and that is a good thing.  As you may recall, I never did get to see those little ducklings last year.  They hatched and left in one big hurry.  

So the garden centers are full of plants.  I would urge all to check out the Market offerings first.  They are locally grown and will do well in our area.  My four plants were started from seeds I managed to save from the plants I bought from Seedtime and Harvest last year.  Two of each is all that I could muster, but it’s a small start.  I will purchase more from them next week.  They are certified organic and were they ever good. 

Here’s a success story!  Last fall I picked up some tulip and daffodil bulbs at the end of the season, and never got them into the ground.  Well, the tulip bulbs rotted, but the daffodils still looked firm from their spot on my garage shelf in February.  I potted them in a big planter on my deck in that month, hoping they would survive. They did!  I have daffodils peeking through the potting soil.  I believe our moderate late winter temps helped in this, but am not sure they would survive one of our complete harsh winters in a pot.  I’ll post some directions I found in a magazine on the MontereyPeninsula in California of all places, during my Easter week visit to my son and his family this year.  Hoping to experiment with those directions later on, fall and winter into next spring and I will keep an update going.

 This year, just turned nine on May 4th granddaughter Piper says she wants to have her own garden, so I am giving her 2/3 of one of my raised beds (the other 1/3 has a second year asparagus bed in it).  We will purchase seeds this weekend for her favorite carrots, lettuce and green beans.  Photos and progress reports will be posted throughout the season.  It’s a great way to get children involved in growing things and learning where their food comes from. 

 In the meantime, enjoy the temperate weather and let’s get planting.  Just keep an eye on the nighttime lows for the next few weeks and be ready to cover as needed.  Looks like we may have a cold dip overnight Saturday, but Sunday looks good.

What a gorgeous rain yesterday!  By my estimation, it started around 5:15 AM (in my part of town) and remained steady until almost 10AM.  At 10:15, I could still hear the water working its way down my gutters.   JuJust a lovely, quiet soaking and I swear everything growing from the parkway to the greenway behind the house seems to be standing at jubilant attention.  The smell of it from the opened window before dawn was wonderful.  Oh, a fun note here:  KELO’s website had a sweet article on why rain smells as it does last week.  Once should still be able to locate it on their site: Why Does Rain Have a Smell? Ben Cathey, published August 13th, 6:25 PM

Well, just an update on the growing things in pots experiment.  Although I am certain the extreme heat of July took its toll, overall, one can certainly do this.  I do feel that tomatoes fare better when planted in a traditional plot, be it in a low-level garden or raised beds in yards with poor soil, but over all, I am seeing some success.  If one wants to can from the harvest of a patio, one would certainly have to have it full of tomato pots, but for the table and a bit to share with immediate neighbors, I think this is a good alternative.  My son in Sacramento CA posted a photo of a “gynormous!” tomato grown in this fashion, about the size a small cantaloupe, so I guess that’s more proof to the positive.

I do have to state that my own yield has been spotty, first the problem with blossom end rot, and just in the general yield.  I have been purchasing supplemental tomatoes from the market to aid in canning sufficient amounts of my pepper, tomato, onion and garlic “mixture” pretty much every week, as my peppers are far out-producing the tomatoes.  Next year, I will put the tomato plants in the existing raised beds and mulch, mulch, mulch.  I would love to have enough to cook and can sauces.  

As for my second crop mentioned earlier; well, I did put in a few more beans and peas, and they are sprouting!  The first crop is canned, as are the small amount of beets (so labor intensive!—anyone know how long to steam them, or an easier way to remove the outer layer?).  One forecast calls for continues above average temps and general dryness into October, so we will see if this second planting comes to fruition.  My “Charlie Brown” great pumpkin vine has one pumpkin the size of a child’s toy basket ball and just a few more baby-sized fruits, so we’ll see.  I always consider pumpkins just for fun, anyway, unless you have enough to consider them a cash crop, of course, and I know many do, but anything we get we’ll be just for fun on this end. 

As will many homeowners, I have to admit that my yard is a mess.  I’ve managed to keep up the front to respectability, but my back yard has weeds going to seed on its perimeters, and I will cut if for the first time in six-weeks?), tomorrow after work   I know my mower still works, as I cut the front a good, long week ago.

Finally, the fall magazines are out and I think we are all already considering the lovely warm days and cool nights of autumn.  Last evening in the dusk of early evening, one of my neighbors had a fire going in one of those portable fire pits in the driveway; the smell was lovely.

Had I known we would have one of the hottest, driest Julys in decades I would have thought twice about planting tomatoes in containers; keeping them evenly watered has taken some effort, but it appears to have been successful. The fruit is finally free of the blossom end rot damage found in the first tomatoes, and I am picking anywhere from six to ten good tomatoes most days. Yesterday I supplemented those with several pounds from the Market and was able to can six pints of my pepper tomato mixture.  Although the fruit is good, I do think planting them in the ground with a good layer of mulch is the preferred way to grow them.  Six to ten tomatoes a day is not that much from the eight plants that I have going.  Although container growing is still a good alternative for those who have no choice but to use a patio, for those who like to can and want a lot of tomatoes, the garden plot appears to be the better option.  

Now that the plants are at their mature height, I must say that supporting them in pots has also been a minor challenge.  I’ve had to tie the cages to my chain link fence to prevent them from toppling over, and I have one large pepper plant that tips over in the wind, although most of the potted peppers are fine, and none of them have required supports.  The peppers did not suffer like the tomatoes did from the early uneven water situation, and so are less problematic for containers.  I am actually getting tons of peppers right now and growing them in pots is a good way to save room in the garden area.

Early morning today almost had the feel of autumn, and I do hope we don’t plunge from the heat of summer right into a frost.  With the temperate break we’re enjoying right now one feels an urgency to get out and catch up those tasks that most of us put aside in the heat.  We had just enough rain to soften the soil so that pulling weeds is actually fun. 

Not much going on other than catching up and maintaining the garden and to begin pulling out those vegetables that have slowed.  My own patch of green and yellow wax beans is slated to give way to what I hope will be an autumn crop of beets, both yellow and reds, kale and spinach I hope!  I may even plant a second season row of beans, just to see if it works. 

Here area a few recipes to use the current glut of peppers.  One is my own, the other is one based on a sample I tried at Hy-Vee on Marion road on Friday and re-created at home.

Stuffed Peppers-serves 4+ adults

4 large green, red or yellow bell peppers, cored and cut in half

1 lb lean ground beef or ground turkey

1 cup cooked brown rice

1 medium sweet onion, Vidalia or Spanish yellow, chopped

1-2 cans cream of mushroom soup

Small amount of milk or broth (chicken or vegetable) to thin the soup a little

Salt and pepper to taste

1 TBS Worcestershire

1 beaten egg

1 cup of shredded Parmesan or other cheese

Combine the beef or turkey with the onion and add the cooked brown rice, egg and the Worcestershire, salt and pepper.  Spoon this into each pepper half in an oblong baking pan.  Thin the condensed soup with either milk or broth to a fairly thick gravy-like consistency and pour over all.  Cover loosely with foil and bake at 350 degrees about 40 minutes until the peppers are tender and meat is cooked through, then uncover and sprinkle a little of the Parmesan on top of each pepper.  Set under a low broiler for a minute or two just to brown and set the tops.  Great with homemade applesauce!

*Minute Rice can also be used, if preferred, and this can be added uncooked with the raw meat.  I just like the firmer texture of the brown rice. 

Pepper and Portobello Mushroom Scramble-serves 2-3 adults

1 each, sliced red and yellow bell peppers

1 or 2 (depending on the size) portabella mushrooms caps, sliced with gills removed

Small amount of oil for sautéing

Half a small sweet onion, sliced

Salt and Pepper to taste

4 to 6 fresh beaten eggs or two or three containers of Hy-Vee cholesterol-free brand 99% egg product

This is so easy!  Just sauté the veggies until crisp tender, then add the egg and cook, stirring until the eggs are set. 

Served with a green salad, it’s a quick and low-fat/calorie dinner.  To make it more substantial, one can also add cooked, diced potato to the veggie mix (or sauté diced potato until tender then add the veggies) and a bit of mild cheese at the end.

Finally, see you at the Farm to Feast this Tuesday!

Last week I pressure canned six pints of mixed yellow wax and Blue Lake green beans with the pressure canner I purchased last August.  It was my first experience with a pressure canner, and I admit to being intimidated, approaching the process as one might poke an old wasp nest on the ground with a long stick to ensure it has been abandoned.  Fearing an explosion, I toyed with the idea of keeping a strong garbage can lid at the ready to act as a defensive shield. But there I was with a good gallon or so of fresh garden beans and more coming on, not to mention an investment in the equipment.  So I re-read the directions several times, bolstered my resolve and just got started.

I am pleased to say that it was an easier process than my usual method of hot-water bath canning!  The jars only had to be washed well and filled with hot water, then emptied, packed with the clean vegetables, salt and boiling water to finish and only 3 quarts of hot water in the canner.  I honestly feel it is a safer process than having a huge vat of boiling water on the stovetop.  One simply has to follow the directions carefully for the initial venting process (v-e-r-y safe and simple) and keep an eye on the pressure gage to ensure it stays at the right pressure. The process is exacting, but the new canners are equipped with good safety features, even letting you know when the steam has dissipated enough to safely open the lid. The process is actually very simple once you begin to work into it.  An additional bonus is that once the desired pressure is attained, one can turn the heat way down to maintain it, so less heat escapes into the kitchen.  It even worked well with my electric stove.  The entire thing went like clock-work. 

Of course, not everything can be canned with this method.  Some sugary fruits will bubble up and create problems, and plain tomato recipes, most fruits, jellies and such should still be water-bath canned.  But for any low-acid vegetable, potatoes, beans, carrots, beets, even my tomato/pepper/onion and garlic mixture, it is a safe and relatively hassle-free way of preserving food.  Just get a recent copy of a good canning book (I mentioned the Ball Bluebook last season, and it’s still my favorite resource for either method.  I also noticed that the Minnehaha county extension offered it as a door prize at their canning seminar several years back) and of course, carefully read and re-read the instruction book that comes with the pressure canner.  Follow the directions exactly, and be happy with the results.   I would also like to thank my neighbor and veteran canner, Carol Kelpin, who walked down the block on a very hot evening to hang out with me after learning I’d taken the plunge.  Your moral support was so appreciated!

And just an update of my experiment of growing tomatoes in pots.  Since my last posting, I’ve kept them evenly bottom-watered, and have picked off every small fruit I see with the beginning of blossom end rot.  It is my hope that the newly developing fruit will be free of this affliction.  So far, all looks good and the pots are soaked daily without exception. 

I’m already getting a good amount of peppers, both Anaheim and bananas, but the bells are yet to come in.  I’ll have enough beets to can just a few pints, and the new asparagus patch is thick with ferns.  All in all, the raised beds are working out well.  It’s been easier to keep them weeded, and harvesting is definitely less back-breaking!  For fun, I planted some pumpkin seeds purchased last February at the Charles Schultz museum in Santa Rosa, California.  Appropriately labeled Great Pumpkin Seeds, they are sending vines all around the rear bed, keeping the weeds down as they go. 

Gardening magazines all agree that now is the time to consider planting a second cool-weather crop for fall, providing we don’t get an early freeze as some are predicting.  The KELO website mentioned last week that the lack of moisture in the air due to the drought situation may prompt this, and of course, there is that whole cicada song prediction, but I think I’ll run the risk.  I’m planting a Blue Lake variety of pole bean where the massacred pea vines used to be (not exactly a cool-weather crop, but hey, if it doesn’t freeze, I may just get a second season of beans to pressure can) and think I’ll throw some radish and spinach seed around the bottom of the vines so they are protected from the hot southern sun.  I may even start a second season of beets in between the existing ones.  Although I’ve never attempted this second planting before, gardening is an experiment, and I’ve already got the seeds.

Don’t forget to get your tickets for the Farm to Table event coming up in a few short weeks on August 7th.   It should be a fun evening of great tasting from local chef creations and live entertainment, of course.  Tickets are available at the market.

Radio Ad features Farm to Feast

By fallspark, July 13th, 2012 | Comments Off on Radio Ad features Farm to Feast

Click here to hear our radio ad for the Farm to Feast event.

Argus Leader features Falls Park Farmers Market

By fallspark, July 10th, 2012 | Comments Off on Argus Leader features Falls Park Farmers Market

Two articles in the Argus Leader recently featured the Falls Park Farmers Market. Click below to read the features.

As we round the corner into mid-summer, I thought it might be a good time to offer a few observations about this year’s plunge into container-grown tomatoes and peppers. I have roughly fifteen pots divided between the two, and so far things look pretty good with only a few concerns.

The tomatoes are full of blossoms and have green fruit, so that looks good. I am finding that a strict watering schedule is required, as the pots dry out much faster than a standard garden plot. As usual, I learned this the hard way. I skipped an evening and had several stressed plants on my hands, resulting in a few tomatoes with blossom end rot. I discarded the affected fruit of course, and am hoping the rest will be all right. I used a moisture control potting medium (mostly because I needed so much, and it was on clearance and light to lift), and although that allows a little more wiggle room, on these hot, hot days, a daily soaking is essential. The tomatoes seem to be more susceptible to stress than the peppers, which are also setting up well. I have to say that the plants I bought on opening day from Seed Time and Harvest are now just huge, and are loaded with my favorite Anaheim peppers! In fact, the heat is making everything jump.

The observation here is the bigger the pot, the better, not so much for the root ball of the plant, as most don’t go that deep, but to keep the soil moisture more constant. Another observation may be that the tomato cages don’t have enough soil depth to properly support the mature plants; we’ll see as the season progresses. I have marigolds planted in the pots along with the vegetables, and there is plenty of room. They help to keep the soil from splashing up on the plants and cut down on the mulch. Although the flowers require regular dead-heading, it’s a pleasant addition. The orange and yellow blooms are a nice contrast to the dark green of the plants. My granddaughter thinks the old marigold blooms smell like skunk! That may be why the rabbits won’t eat them. One big benefit is the portability of the potted vegetables. They are mostly all in foam pots, and with the lighter soil mix are easy to move around for weeding or what have you. If hail threatens, one can push them to safer ground with ease.

My greenway neighbor had a water feature installed, and I have to say that aside from its visual appeal, the sound of the falling water is a welcome addition to our quiet area, as I begin to work my way through the miasma of weeds in my back beds. Although the problem is not as extreme as last year, without sufficient ground cover and rock or bark in the open areas, the weeds have crept in again, and in a different array. No more towering stands of black nightshade, but certainly a good amount of those low-growing vines with the heart-shaped leaves. I also think I’ve discovered just how large and colorful dandelions can become if ignored for six to eight weeks; either that or I’ve got an entire new weed I’ve never seen, and I suspect this is in fact the case. Either way (note to neighbors) I have a serious plan, a vision! Please bear with me. By September, my back yard should look as if it actually belongs to the neighborhood. I’ve mentioned to several acquaintances that it feels to me like uncovering the secret garden back there, a square foot at a time.

I also realize that the hackberry tree did indeed impart some early to mid-morning shade in those same areas, and now that it is gone, it is in full sun all day. In this hot and muggy weather I’ve no choice but to return to my former solution. I open my patio umbrella right out there in its stand, and get my big garage fan going. All one needs is a good long extension cord. Unfortunately, I can’t do much about the humidity, but working in the shade with a bit of a breeze sure helps. One can control one’s environment to some extent, at least. Of course, this only works on days when the weather is still, otherwise the umbrella becomes airborne. I’ve chased it down the greenway more than once.

And lastly, I’ve been hearing cicadas for a week! If the old wives tale holds true, that would put our first frost at mid-August! As unlikely as that seems, it could indicate an early cold spell in September. Nature offers its own predictions (think I’ll check the almanac).